Tag Archive for: The Scottish Banner

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The Scottish Banner
Feb 2022

In this issue... LOCH LOMOND: A STORY OF CULLODEN The song Loch Lomond is well-known by Scots. Most of us learnt it as children. The lyrics are not immediately clear; it is a lament bout “me and my true love” but it does not say who they were. The story behind the song is true. “Me and my true love” were Robert King and his wife Janet Kissock who lived in Renfrewshire from 1673 to 1746. They courted in 1698 - 1700 and married in 1700, to be parted by his death 46 years later. FINLAY WILSON: THE KILTED YOGI Viral Scottish yoga star Finlay Wilson is back with his new book Wild Kilted Yoga: Flow and Feel Free, get ready for more tartan, more dramatic scenery and more tips and tricks to make your yoga practice extra special. Finlay took time to speak to the Scottish Banner on his love of yoga, his rescue dog Amaloh, tartan and of course Scotland. THE KING AT PLEASURE AND PRAYER James IV is usually remembered as the tragic king who not only lost the Battle of Flodden in 1513, but also died on the field. In fact, he was a very much more complex and interesting figure who influenced both the world of the church and the world of the arts. One place where these interests came together was Linlithgow Palace.
Cover of The Scottish Banner • January 2022 Issue
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The Scottish Banner
Jan 2022

In this issue... FOR THESE ARE MY MOUNTAINS | The Scottish Banner speaks to Tristan Cameron Harper.  Tristan Cameron Harper is a photographer and mountain guide with a passion for Scotland’s incredible outdoors. Tristan took the time to speak to the Scottish Banner on his love of the Scottish Highlands, being a former professional ice hockey player and Munro Bagging. SCOTLAND AFTER DARK | Keeping curiosity alive after sunset. David C. Wenczok explores the beauty of Edinburgh after dark. "I write this in Edinburgh on the 4th of December, it is fully dark outside by 15:45. Elsewhere in Scotland, night comes much sooner. wo days ago, a friend who recently moved back to Orkney after several years living in the Central Belt lamented the loss of all-natural light there by 14:30. Tellingly, the Scottish Gaelic term for the month of December is..." SCOTLAND IS CALLING FOR 2022 | Misty green landscapes and towering peaks, ancient city streets and tales of the past, freshly opened casks and the cent of seasonal dishes... they are all calling. Calling explorers, thrill-seekers, beach-goers, city-breakers, solo travellers, families, and everyone in between – no matter the season Scotland is the place...
digital download of The Scottish Banner Oct 21
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The Scottish Banner
Oct 2021

In this issue... Talking Tartan Across The World The Scottish Banner recently caught up with ScotlandShop’s founding director Anna White on being in the tartan business, opening a new North American branch and her love of the Scottish Borders. Sailing Down The Water Scotland's steamboats. In their hundreds, they once chuffed and puffed their way along the mighty River Clyde, as well as many other canals and waterways of the west coast of Scotland. Before the advent of diesel power, it was steamboats that ruled the water, carrying cargo and passengers to remote communities and scenic holiday spots. And it was fitting that the area became home to so many steamers – while there were several inventors and engineers around the world working on the idea of putting Scotsman James Watt’s steam engine to work in boats, it was in Scotland that key developments were made in an industry that was to transform the world... Dumbarton Rock Scotland's most underrated fortress? Find an outcrop of rock in Scotland and chances are someone, at some point, called it a seat of power. Inland crags, coastal cliffs, and the stone spires left by retreating glaciers 12,000 years ago are commonly crowned by castles or their prehistoric equivalents - duns, brochs, hillforts, lookout towers, and every other type of fortification imaginable...