Hogmanay: The Origins and Traditions of Scotland’s New Year Celebration

Heritage, Scottish Holidays

While New Year’s Eve is celebrated around the world, the Scots have a long rich heritage associated with this event – and have their own name for it, Hogmanay.

What is Hogmanay?

Hogmanay fireworks over Edinburgh, Scotland

Scotland is  the only nation in the world that celebrates the New Year with such enthusiasm and passion that it has its own holiday known as Hogmanay. Hogmanay is such a very important celebration in Scottish culture and traditions. It marks the end of one year and the beginning of a new one, and is often seen as a time to reflect on the past and make plans for the future. In Scotland, Hogmanay is a time for families and friends to come together and celebrate, often with feasts, parties, and other festive activities.

But where did Hogmanay come from, and what does it mean to the people of Scotland? Why is it different from other New Year’s celebrations?

In this article, we will explore the history of Hogmanay and the traditions that have made it a beloved celebration in Scotland and beyond. From its possible connections to ancient pagan festivals to the ways it is celebrated today, we will delve into the rich history and cultural significance of this beloved Scottish holiday. So, let’s begin our journey through the history of Hogmanay and discover the origins and traditions of Scotland’s New Year celebration.

The Origins & History of Hogmanay

Hogmanay, or Scotland’s New Year celebration, is known for its revelry. It is believed to have originated from the Vikings, who brought their traditional celebrations of the Winter Solstice to Scotland in the 8th and 9th centuries. In Shetland, where the Viking influence is still strong, New Year is referred to as Yules, named after the Scandinavian midwinter festival of Yule.

There are many theories about the derivation of the word “Hogmanay”. The Scandinavian word for the feast preceding Yule was “Hoggo-nott” while the Flemish words (many have come into Scots) “hoog min dag” means “great love day”. Hogmanay could also be traced back to the Anglo-Saxon, Haleg monath, Holy Month, or the Gaelic, oge maidne, new morning. But the most likely source seems to be the French. “Homme est né” or “Man is born” while in France the last day of the year when gifts were exchanged was “aguillaneuf” while in Normandy presents given at that time were “hoguignetes”.

Christmas Banned In Scotland

Christmas is a beloved holiday that is celebrated around the world, but did you know that in Scotland, the celebration of Christmas was actually banned for over four centuries. From the 16th to the 19th centuries, the observance of Christmas was strictly prohibited in Scotland, and those who were caught celebrating the holiday could face severe penalties.

Why a ban on Christmas? This can be traced back to the Protestant Reformation, which began in the 16th century. During this time, the Church of Scotland sought to reform and purify the church, and one way they did this was by banning certain practices and traditions that were seen as “papist” or too closely associated with Catholicism. Christmas was one such tradition that was targeted, as it was seen as a holiday that had been heavily influenced by Roman Catholicism.

Until as recently as the the 1950s, many Scots worked over Christmas and then celebrated their winter solstice holiday at the new year on Hogmanay. It wasn’t until 1958 that Christmas became a public holiday in Scotland.

The Evolution of Hogmanay

Hogmanay has evolved significantly over time. From its origins in ancient pagan festivals to its current form as a beloved holiday in Scotland and beyond, Hogmanay has undergone numerous changes and adaptations throughout its history.

One of the earliest known references to Hogmanay comes from the 16th century, when the celebration was described as a time of “reveling and great licentiousness.” At this time, Hogmanay was associated with heavy drinking and wild partying, and was often viewed with suspicion by the Church and other authorities.

Over time, Hogmanay began to evolve and take on new traditions and customs. In the 19th century, the “first-footing” tradition emerged, in which people went from house to house to wish their friends and neighbors a happy New Year. This tradition, which is believed to bring good luck to the household, has become a staple of Hogmanay celebrations.

In the 20th century, Hogmanay underwent further evolution with the rise of major festivals and events, such as the famous street party in Edinburgh. These events, which draw large crowds and feature live music, fireworks, and other festive activities, have helped to further popularize and mainstream Hogmanay as a celebration.

Customs And Traditions Of Hogmanay

Singing Auld Lang Syne

One of the most well-known traditions of more modern Hogmanay celebrations is the singing of “Auld Lang Syne,” a poem written by the Scottish poet Robert Burns in the 18th century. The title of the poem can be translated as “old long since,” or “days gone by,” and it reflects on the passage of time and the importance of friendship and nostalgia. The poem has been set to music, and it is traditionally sung at Hogmanay celebrations as a way of bidding farewell to the old year and welcoming in the new one.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
And the days of auld lang syne?

For auld lang syne, my dear
For auld lang syne
We’ll drink a cup of kindness yet
For the sake of auld lang syne

During Hogmanay celebrations, it is common for people to join hands in a circle and sing “Auld Lang Syne” as the clock strikes midnight. The song has become an integral part of Hogmanay traditions, and it is often used as a way to bring people together and celebrate the New Year with a sense of camaraderie and shared history. In addition to being sung at Hogmanay celebrations, “Auld Lang Syne” has also become a popular song at New Year’s Eve celebrations around the world.

First Footing

One of the most iconic traditions of Hogmanay is the “first-footing” custom.  As friends visit a household at Hogmanay, to ensure good luck for the house, the first person across the threshold after midnight should be a dark-haired male bearing symbolic pieces of coal, shortbread, salt, black bun and a wee dram of whisky. The tradition of the dark-haired male is believed to harken back to the Viking age, when a big blonde stranger arriving on your door step with a big axe meant big trouble, and probably not a very happy New Year!  Today, the “first-footing” custom remains an important and beloved part of Hogmanay celebrations in Scotland.

Fire and Light As Symbols Of Renewal and Purification

Stonehaven Fireballs Parade

In many cultures, fire has long been seen as a powerful force that has the ability to cleanse and purify, and it is often used in rituals and ceremonies to mark the start of a new year or a new cycle. During traditional Hogmanay celebrations, people would dress up in the hides of cattle and run around the village while being hit with sticks. Bonfires and torches were also lit as part of the festivities. The smoke produced by ignited sticks wrapped in animal hide was believed to be effective in warding off evil spirits, and these smoking sticks were known as Hogmanays.

Many of these customs, such as the use of sheep skins and bannocks, continue to be observed in the older communities of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, particularly on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides. During Hogmanay celebrations, young men and boys form opposing bands and move through the village from house to house reciting Gaelic rhymes. The leader of each band wears a sheep skin, while another member carries a sack, and they are given bannocks as they go from house to house.

Fireworks, which were introduced to Hogmanay celebrations in the 19th century, have become a staple of the holiday, with displays taking place in cities and towns across Scotland.

In addition to bonfires and fireworks, the use of candles and torches is also common during Hogmanay celebrations. These sources of light are often used to symbolize the arrival of the new year and to chase away any remaining negativity from the old year.

Gift-giving And Charitable Acts

During the holiday, it is common for people to exchange gifts with their friends and loved ones, often in the form of small tokens or treats. These gifts are seen as a way of expressing goodwill and wishing others a happy and prosperous new year.

In addition to gift-giving, charitable acts are also an important part of Hogmanay traditions. Many people use the holiday as an opportunity to give back to their community and help those in need. This can take the form of donating money or food to charitable organizations, volunteering time to help others, or simply showing kindness and compassion to those around them.

Ceilidh Dancing and Other Festive Activities

Ceilidh dancing, which is a traditional form of Scottish folk dancing, is often featured at Hogmanay parties and events, and is a fun and energetic way for people to celebrate the holiday. Ceilidh dancing involves a variety of lively dances that are easy to learn and suitable for all ages, and it is a popular activity that helps to bring people together and create a sense of community.

In addition to ceilidh dancing, there are many other festive activities that are often enjoyed during Hogmanay celebrations. These may include games, singing, and other forms of entertainment, such as live music or comedy performances. Many Hogmanay parties and events also feature food and drink, with traditional Scottish dishes and beverages being particularly popular.

Hogmanay Today

Popularity of Hogmanay Events in Scotland

Hogmanay festivals and events have become increasingly popular in Scotland over the years, attracting large crowds and visitors from around the world. One of the most famous Hogmanay festivals is the Edinburgh Street Party, which takes place in the capital city of Scotland and features live music, fireworks, and other festive activities. The Edinburgh Street Party attracts hundreds of thousands of people each year, and has become a major cultural event that is enjoyed by people of all ages.

One of the most impressive fire ceremonies during Hogmanay celebrations takes place in Stonehaven, a town on the northeast coast of Scotland. At this event, giant fireballs are swung around on long metal poles, requiring several men to carry them as they are paraded up and down the main street. It is believed that this tradition has roots in the Winter Solstice, with the swinging fireballs representing the power of the sun and purifying the world by consuming evil spirits.

In addition to these, there are many other Hogmanay festivals and events that are held throughout Scotland each year. These may include traditional ceilidhs, concerts, parades, and other activities that are designed to celebrate Hogmanay with style and enthusiasm. Many of these events are held in small towns and villages, and provide an opportunity for people to come together and celebrate the holiday with their community.

Celebration of Hogmanay Amongst The Scottish Diaspora

The celebration of Hogmanay is not limited to Scotland itself.  The Scottish diaspora, or the communities of people of Scottish descent who live outside of Scotland, also participate in the celebration of Hogmanay, often in their own unique ways.

In countries around the world, Scottish heritage societies and cultural organizations often host Hogmanay events and festivals, providing an opportunity for people of Scottish descent to come together and celebrate the holiday. These events may feature traditional Scottish music, dancing, and food, as well as modern activities and entertainment.

In addition to events and festivals, many people of Scottish descent also celebrate Hogmanay in their own homes, observing the holiday with their families and friends. This may involve traditional customs and activities, such as singing “Auld Lang Syne” and participating in the “first-footing” tradition, or simply enjoying a festive meal and welcoming in the new year with friends and loved ones.

Role of Hogmanay In Preserving and Celebrating Scottish Culture and Traditions

The celebration of Hogmanay plays a significant role in preserving and celebrating Scottish culture and traditions. The holiday is an important part of Scotland’s cultural identity, and it provides an opportunity for people to come together and celebrate the unique customs and traditions of their country.

Through the various traditions and activities associated with Hogmanay, Scots around the world are able to connect with their heritage and learn about the rich history and cultural traditions of Scotland. These traditions are passed down from generation to generation, helping to ensure that they remain an important part of Scottish culture.

In addition to preserving and celebrating Scottish culture, Hogmanay also serves as a way for people to come together and build a sense of community. Whether it is through participating in ancient traditions or simply enjoying a meal with friends and loved ones, Hogmanay provides an opportunity for people to connect and celebrate the start of a new year with a sense of unity and shared purpose.

Keeping The History and Tradition of Hogmanay Alive

Hogmanay is a beloved tradition in Scotland, marked by a wide range of customs and activities that have evolved over time. From the “first-footing” tradition and the singing of “Auld Lang Syne” to the use of fire and light as symbols of renewal and purification, Hogmanay is a holiday that is rich in cultural significance and meaning.

The popularity of Hogmanay festivals and events, both in Scotland and among the Scottish diaspora, speaks to the enduring appeal of this holiday and its ability to bring people together in celebration. Whether it is through gift-giving and charitable acts, ceilidh dancing and other festive activities, or simply coming together with friends and loved ones to mark the start of a new year, Hogmanay is a time for joy, festivity, and connection.

Hogmanay remains an important part of contemporary Scottish culture and society, and it is a holiday that is celebrated with great enthusiasm and joy by people of all ages. The holiday has a rich history and cultural significance, and it continues to be a time for celebration, community, and connection.

Diana MacFarlane, FSAScot

Executive Director

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Hogmanay: The Origins and Traditions of Scotland’s New Year Celebration

Scottish Holidays, Heritage

While New Year’s Eve is celebrated around the world, the Scots have a long rich heritage associated with this event – and have their own name for it, Hogmanay.

What is Hogmanay?

Hogmanay fireworks over Edinburgh, Scotland

Scotland is  the only nation in the world that celebrates the New Year with such enthusiasm and passion that it has its own holiday known as Hogmanay. Hogmanay is such a very important celebration in Scottish culture and traditions. It marks the end of one year and the beginning of a new one, and is often seen as a time to reflect on the past and make plans for the future. In Scotland, Hogmanay is a time for families and friends to come together and celebrate, often with feasts, parties, and other festive activities.

But where did Hogmanay come from, and what does it mean to the people of Scotland? Why is it different from other New Year’s celebrations?

In this article, we will explore the history of Hogmanay and the traditions that have made it a beloved celebration in Scotland and beyond. From its possible connections to ancient pagan festivals to the ways it is celebrated today, we will delve into the rich history and cultural significance of this beloved Scottish holiday. So, let’s begin our journey through the history of Hogmanay and discover the origins and traditions of Scotland’s New Year celebration.

The Origins & History of Hogmanay

Hogmanay, or Scotland’s New Year celebration, is known for its revelry. It is believed to have originated from the Vikings, who brought their traditional celebrations of the Winter Solstice to Scotland in the 8th and 9th centuries. In Shetland, where the Viking influence is still strong, New Year is referred to as Yules, named after the Scandinavian midwinter festival of Yule.

There are many theories about the derivation of the word “Hogmanay”. The Scandinavian word for the feast preceding Yule was “Hoggo-nott” while the Flemish words (many have come into Scots) “hoog min dag” means “great love day”. Hogmanay could also be traced back to the Anglo-Saxon, Haleg monath, Holy Month, or the Gaelic, oge maidne, new morning. But the most likely source seems to be the French. “Homme est né” or “Man is born” while in France the last day of the year when gifts were exchanged was “aguillaneuf” while in Normandy presents given at that time were “hoguignetes”.

Christmas Banned In Scotland

Christmas is a beloved holiday that is celebrated around the world, but did you know that in Scotland, the celebration of Christmas was actually banned for over four centuries. From the 16th to the 19th centuries, the observance of Christmas was strictly prohibited in Scotland, and those who were caught celebrating the holiday could face severe penalties.

Why a ban on Christmas? This can be traced back to the Protestant Reformation, which began in the 16th century. During this time, the Church of Scotland sought to reform and purify the church, and one way they did this was by banning certain practices and traditions that were seen as “papist” or too closely associated with Catholicism. Christmas was one such tradition that was targeted, as it was seen as a holiday that had been heavily influenced by Roman Catholicism.

Until as recently as the the 1950s, many Scots worked over Christmas and then celebrated their winter solstice holiday at the new year on Hogmanay. It wasn’t until 1958 that Christmas became a public holiday in Scotland.

The Evolution of Hogmanay

Hogmanay has evolved significantly over time. From its origins in ancient pagan festivals to its current form as a beloved holiday in Scotland and beyond, Hogmanay has undergone numerous changes and adaptations throughout its history.

One of the earliest known references to Hogmanay comes from the 16th century, when the celebration was described as a time of “reveling and great licentiousness.” At this time, Hogmanay was associated with heavy drinking and wild partying, and was often viewed with suspicion by the Church and other authorities.

Over time, Hogmanay began to evolve and take on new traditions and customs. In the 19th century, the “first-footing” tradition emerged, in which people went from house to house to wish their friends and neighbors a happy New Year. This tradition, which is believed to bring good luck to the household, has become a staple of Hogmanay celebrations.

In the 20th century, Hogmanay underwent further evolution with the rise of major festivals and events, such as the famous street party in Edinburgh. These events, which draw large crowds and feature live music, fireworks, and other festive activities, have helped to further popularize and mainstream Hogmanay as a celebration.

Customs And Traditions Of Hogmanay

Singing Auld Lang Syne

One of the most well-known traditions of more modern Hogmanay celebrations is the singing of “Auld Lang Syne,” a poem written by the Scottish poet Robert Burns in the 18th century. The title of the poem can be translated as “old long since,” or “days gone by,” and it reflects on the passage of time and the importance of friendship and nostalgia. The poem has been set to music, and it is traditionally sung at Hogmanay celebrations as a way of bidding farewell to the old year and welcoming in the new one.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
And the days of auld lang syne?

For auld lang syne, my dear
For auld lang syne
We’ll drink a cup of kindness yet
For the sake of auld lang syne

During Hogmanay celebrations, it is common for people to join hands in a circle and sing “Auld Lang Syne” as the clock strikes midnight. The song has become an integral part of Hogmanay traditions, and it is often used as a way to bring people together and celebrate the New Year with a sense of camaraderie and shared history. In addition to being sung at Hogmanay celebrations, “Auld Lang Syne” has also become a popular song at New Year’s Eve celebrations around the world.

First Footing

One of the most iconic traditions of Hogmanay is the “first-footing” custom.  As friends visit a household at Hogmanay, to ensure good luck for the house, the first person across the threshold after midnight should be a dark-haired male bearing symbolic pieces of coal, shortbread, salt, black bun and a wee dram of whisky. The tradition of the dark-haired male is believed to harken back to the Viking age, when a big blonde stranger arriving on your door step with a big axe meant big trouble, and probably not a very happy New Year!  Today, the “first-footing” custom remains an important and beloved part of Hogmanay celebrations in Scotland.

Fire and Light As Symbols Of Renewal and Purification

Stonehaven Fireballs Parade

In many cultures, fire has long been seen as a powerful force that has the ability to cleanse and purify, and it is often used in rituals and ceremonies to mark the start of a new year or a new cycle. During traditional Hogmanay celebrations, people would dress up in the hides of cattle and run around the village while being hit with sticks. Bonfires and torches were also lit as part of the festivities. The smoke produced by ignited sticks wrapped in animal hide was believed to be effective in warding off evil spirits, and these smoking sticks were known as Hogmanays.

Many of these customs, such as the use of sheep skins and bannocks, continue to be observed in the older communities of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, particularly on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides. During Hogmanay celebrations, young men and boys form opposing bands and move through the village from house to house reciting Gaelic rhymes. The leader of each band wears a sheep skin, while another member carries a sack, and they are given bannocks as they go from house to house.

Fireworks, which were introduced to Hogmanay celebrations in the 19th century, have become a staple of the holiday, with displays taking place in cities and towns across Scotland.

In addition to bonfires and fireworks, the use of candles and torches is also common during Hogmanay celebrations. These sources of light are often used to symbolize the arrival of the new year and to chase away any remaining negativity from the old year.

Gift-giving And Charitable Acts

During the holiday, it is common for people to exchange gifts with their friends and loved ones, often in the form of small tokens or treats. These gifts are seen as a way of expressing goodwill and wishing others a happy and prosperous new year.

In addition to gift-giving, charitable acts are also an important part of Hogmanay traditions. Many people use the holiday as an opportunity to give back to their community and help those in need. This can take the form of donating money or food to charitable organizations, volunteering time to help others, or simply showing kindness and compassion to those around them.

Ceilidh Dancing and Other Festive Activities

Ceilidh dancing, which is a traditional form of Scottish folk dancing, is often featured at Hogmanay parties and events, and is a fun and energetic way for people to celebrate the holiday. Ceilidh dancing involves a variety of lively dances that are easy to learn and suitable for all ages, and it is a popular activity that helps to bring people together and create a sense of community.

In addition to ceilidh dancing, there are many other festive activities that are often enjoyed during Hogmanay celebrations. These may include games, singing, and other forms of entertainment, such as live music or comedy performances. Many Hogmanay parties and events also feature food and drink, with traditional Scottish dishes and beverages being particularly popular.

Hogmanay Today

Popularity of Hogmanay Events in Scotland

Hogmanay festivals and events have become increasingly popular in Scotland over the years, attracting large crowds and visitors from around the world. One of the most famous Hogmanay festivals is the Edinburgh Street Party, which takes place in the capital city of Scotland and features live music, fireworks, and other festive activities. The Edinburgh Street Party attracts hundreds of thousands of people each year, and has become a major cultural event that is enjoyed by people of all ages.

One of the most impressive fire ceremonies during Hogmanay celebrations takes place in Stonehaven, a town on the northeast coast of Scotland. At this event, giant fireballs are swung around on long metal poles, requiring several men to carry them as they are paraded up and down the main street. It is believed that this tradition has roots in the Winter Solstice, with the swinging fireballs representing the power of the sun and purifying the world by consuming evil spirits.

In addition to these, there are many other Hogmanay festivals and events that are held throughout Scotland each year. These may include traditional ceilidhs, concerts, parades, and other activities that are designed to celebrate Hogmanay with style and enthusiasm. Many of these events are held in small towns and villages, and provide an opportunity for people to come together and celebrate the holiday with their community.

Celebration of Hogmanay Amongst The Scottish Diaspora

The celebration of Hogmanay is not limited to Scotland itself.  The Scottish diaspora, or the communities of people of Scottish descent who live outside of Scotland, also participate in the celebration of Hogmanay, often in their own unique ways.

In countries around the world, Scottish heritage societies and cultural organizations often host Hogmanay events and festivals, providing an opportunity for people of Scottish descent to come together and celebrate the holiday. These events may feature traditional Scottish music, dancing, and food, as well as modern activities and entertainment.

In addition to events and festivals, many people of Scottish descent also celebrate Hogmanay in their own homes, observing the holiday with their families and friends. This may involve traditional customs and activities, such as singing “Auld Lang Syne” and participating in the “first-footing” tradition, or simply enjoying a festive meal and welcoming in the new year with friends and loved ones.

Role of Hogmanay In Preserving and Celebrating Scottish Culture and Traditions

The celebration of Hogmanay plays a significant role in preserving and celebrating Scottish culture and traditions. The holiday is an important part of Scotland’s cultural identity, and it provides an opportunity for people to come together and celebrate the unique customs and traditions of their country.

Through the various traditions and activities associated with Hogmanay, Scots around the world are able to connect with their heritage and learn about the rich history and cultural traditions of Scotland. These traditions are passed down from generation to generation, helping to ensure that they remain an important part of Scottish culture.

In addition to preserving and celebrating Scottish culture, Hogmanay also serves as a way for people to come together and build a sense of community. Whether it is through participating in ancient traditions or simply enjoying a meal with friends and loved ones, Hogmanay provides an opportunity for people to connect and celebrate the start of a new year with a sense of unity and shared purpose.

Keeping The History and Tradition of Hogmanay Alive

Hogmanay is a beloved tradition in Scotland, marked by a wide range of customs and activities that have evolved over time. From the “first-footing” tradition and the singing of “Auld Lang Syne” to the use of fire and light as symbols of renewal and purification, Hogmanay is a holiday that is rich in cultural significance and meaning.

The popularity of Hogmanay festivals and events, both in Scotland and among the Scottish diaspora, speaks to the enduring appeal of this holiday and its ability to bring people together in celebration. Whether it is through gift-giving and charitable acts, ceilidh dancing and other festive activities, or simply coming together with friends and loved ones to mark the start of a new year, Hogmanay is a time for joy, festivity, and connection.

Hogmanay remains an important part of contemporary Scottish culture and society, and it is a holiday that is celebrated with great enthusiasm and joy by people of all ages. The holiday has a rich history and cultural significance, and it continues to be a time for celebration, community, and connection.

Diana MacFarlane, FSAScot

Executive Director

0 replies

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